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HOW CAN I PROTECT MY LIBRE SENSOR FROM KNOCKS?

Female arm against door frame wearing a Freestyle Libre sensor cgm.

What to do about doorframes and more   

Many Libre wearers experience difficulty getting the full 14-day use of their Libre sensor. One of the common problems that arises is that they’re prone to knocks -who knew that you have a habit of rubbing up against doorways? Then there’s the issue with getting clothes on and off, or catching it on a car seatbelt, not to mention the likelihood of ‘accidents’ whilst participating in sports or working out in the gym.

It’s not just the annoyance of ‘losing a sensor’ to a door frame either, for those self-funding there is a considerable cost at stake and for NHS users, the possibility of repeated failings leading to a funding review. It’s also the inconvenience - getting a replacement sensor may take anything up to a week and often depends on a call to Abbott or putting in a prescription to the GP and then waiting for it to be dispensed.

Using an armband to cover the Libre during exercise can help to prevent accidents which may cause the sensor to loosen or come off, and as I experienced, it increased my confidence when working out enabling me to fully participate at the gym without worrying about the sensor’s adhesion at the back of my mind.

Some users have also reported that the Libreband helps to reduce more general anxiety associated with every-day movement whilst wearing the sensor, and over time users ‘learn’ to subtly modify body movements to take account of the positioning of the sensor with the Libreband acting as a guard against accidental contact.

The Libreband can be worn when swimming and in the shower too. Many of our customers have taken these on their holidays and commented very favourably having worn it in the sea and for a wide variety of leisure activities. In fact, previous customers include a competitive swimmer and established triathlete.

Be Bold

The Libreband is available in a range of colours intended to match in with current designs in Athleisure wear. The faceplate designs allow wearers to make a positive statement about their condition, and the bands are individually edged to complement the design.

Be Confident

Wearing a sensor can sometimes attract unwanted attention and I’ve heard several anecdotes of a sensor’s ‘mistaken identity’. Such as the device being a nicotine patch (on a young child), an MP3 player, a security tag and even a bottle top! Other wearers have also reported that little children seem tempted to pull on the device whether worn by an adult or another child. The Libreband helps to protect the sensor from these types of interactions, being similar to wearing an armband for holding a phone whilst running.

 Be Assured

Not all armbands, guardians or holders for the Libre are created equal! We’ve taken particular care in choosing and testing the components that go into our Libreband, with an emphasis on comfort and style. The band uses neoprene, rather than elastic and we use branded Velcro to ensure the security of the fastening. The product has been extensively tested for durability in a variety of situations including at a water park, in a sauna and whilst participating in a wide range of gym classes, from yoga to more hard-core body combat!

 

 This article is the author’s own view and is not intended to be medical advice. You should always seek individual advice from your health professional. There is no endorsement of the product, FreeStyle Libre[1] or Abbott. The author is a type 1 diabetic and user of the FreeStyle Libre 1 which is funded by the NHS.

 

[1] FreeStyle Libre is a registered trademark of Abbott Diabetes Care Inc.

2 comments

Ivelina

Also, can you scan the sensor through the Libreband with your mobile phone? It looks great, by the way, I love the designs !

william ormiston

How do I get one please

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